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The harmful substances produced by heating without burning are obviously lower than those of traditional cigarettes

2020/11/24|Knowledge

According to vapingpost, a study investigated the effect of heating non combustible products on indoor air quality. The results show that compared with traditional cigarettes, the air pollution caused by heating non combustion products is very small.

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Scientific research published in peer-reviewed journals aims to determine the impact of heated tobacco products (THs) on air quality. These products, such as PMI's iqos, are battery powered smoke-free alternatives that heat cigarettes containing tobacco. These refills, which look like short cigarettes, must be inserted into the main device and heated when the main device is turned on.

Researchers at the Kaunas University of technology in Lithuania conducted such a study in 2019 to analyze the levels of aerosol particles, carbonyl groups and nicotine in indoor air of ths. They compared indoor concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, nicotine, and particulate matter 2.5 with concentrations of traditional cigarettes and other known air pollutants.

The data compiled show that any adverse effects of ths on indoor air quality are negligible compared with cigarette smoke and other pollutants. Compared with the background, the use of ths led to a significant increase in the statistics of several analytes including nicotine, acetaldehyde, PM2.5 and PNC.

The summary of the study showed that the levels of nicotine, acetaldehyde, PNC and PM2.5 were 16, 8, 8 and 28 times lower than those of traditional cigarettes (CC) under the same conditions.

"In a controlled environment, the concentrations of formaldehyde, benzene, toluene and PM2.5 produced by using ths (and e-cigarettes) were the lowest among most of the sources studied (traditional cigarettes, water pipes, incense, mosquito repellent incense)," the study's lead authors, Violeta kaune, Marija mesutovic akhtarieva and matuzeweiss, added.

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