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Us: with the decline of evali cases, the market of compliant marijuana e-cigarettes is gradually warming up

2020/09/27|本站原创|Industry news

According to foreign reports, a few days ago, the US cannabis e-cigarette company reported that as consumers began to understand the dangers of black market cannabis e-cigarettes, regular hemp product sales are returning to normal.

E-cigarette market recovery

It is reported that the United States last year due to illegal thc pen vitamin E acetate caused by the outbreak of electronic aerosol lung disease (evali), resulting in a sharp drop in legal cannabis sales.

Arnaud Dumas de rauly, co-founder and chief executive of Blinc group, a New York e-cigarette maker, believes this is the biggest impact of the e-cigarette health scare. "It makes consumers realize that you can't buy anything that uses marijuana, especially from unknown sources," he said

According to the Centers for Disease Control and prevention centers, the outbreak of e-cigarette or steam related lung injury (evali) in the summer of 2019 led to slower growth in some companies. But, like other cannabis products, e-cigarettes seem to have survived not only the health crisis, but also the current economic downturn.

"We've seen a huge rebound from the e-cigarette crisis," said Sammy Dorf, chief growth officer and co-founder of Verano holdings, a vertically integrated marijuana company in Chicago. Sales are very good at the moment. "

According to the e-cigarette company, the covid-19 flu pandemic did not slow business activity much, despite new warnings that smoking and e-cigarettes can make people more susceptible to the virus.

"We haven't seen a change in the buying patterns of our patients or customers due to the flu pandemic," doff added.

Since the summer of 2019, the health crisis of e-cigarettes has been rapidly unfolding, and the mainstream media has misled the masses and government agencies due to false reports. Some states with regulated cannabis markets, such as Washington, temporarily ban the addition of additives to e-cigarettes, while others, including Massachusetts, completely ban the sale of e-cigarettes.

It took months for more information about the disease to surface. Scientists have identified a substance, vitamin E acetate, added to some e-cigarettes as a cutting agent, which may be responsible for lung disease.

Many industry officials claim that vitamin E is more common in illegal market products and point out that legal marijuana is regulated, tested and safer than unregulated Street products.

Recently, an academic study published in August confirmed that countries lacking licensed, controlled cannabis, especially the northern Midwest, had the highest escape rates. "These results suggest that evali cases are not caused by the use of e-cigarettes or marijuana itself, but by the most popular locally marketed e-liquids or additives in the affected areas," the report from the Addiction Research Society said

"We think the data clearly show that there are fewer cases of lung disease and injury in states with legal, regulated cannabis products," said Steve fox, strategic adviser to the marijuana Trade Federation. In fact, the lowest incidence rate is Colorado, Washington state and Alaska, which have legalized the three countries, "said California.

Sales of e-cigarette products in the three marijuana legal states have generally recovered, according to headset, a Seattle data analysis firm. But another marijuana legal state, Nevada retailers, found that sales were still below pre health panic levels after the state imposed stricter blockades on marijuana retailers.

According to the report, several senior executives of cannabis e-cigarette enterprises said in an interview that sales had completely rebounded. George Sadler, President of San Diego based platinum e-cigarettes, said sales stagnated after the initial panic, but began to rise in the early winter.

Dumas de rauly said his sales began to pick up in December last year as consumer confidence in the legal market recovered. "Our hardware revenues have doubled since the e-cigarette crisis," Dumas drauli said. But he added that his business could lose a year of growth due to earlier sales declines.

In Denver, Dan gardenswaltz, spherex's chief operating officer, said the company's sales had never been "hit meaningfully, but by the end of 2019 it was a bit of a roller coaster. "It was a very strange period," he said. "The e-cigarette crisis is a very terrible thing for people in the industry."

Seth Wiggins, chief revenue officer at clear marijuana, also in Denver, saw sales fall for about 60-90 days, and then the trend began to reverse. He added that the health crisis was very painful at first, but his company had record sales in recent months. These customers are moving from illegal suppliers to legitimate suppliers.

"A compliant market allows for more regulation and security," he added. "It has broken through the critical point where the cost base is not worth the risk."

Morgan fox, a spokesman for the national Hemp Industry Association, also pointed to the trend. "Across the board, we see a lot of people leaving unregulated markets, mainly because of public health concerns," he said.

Gartenswatz said he saw more people in California transiting from the illegal market to the legal market than in Colorado, where illegal pharmacies that sell products are more strictly regulated.

He cited weedmaps's decision to reduce advertising in unlicensed pharmacies, which helped consumers find legitimate, tested e-cigarettes. Consumers are more aware that they are going to licensed pharmacies, and stores in California even display QR codes on their storefronts so that customers know they are buying from legitimate stores.

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